paris fashion week|nina ricci fall rtw 2011

Peter Copping, designer of unapologetically feminine fare, based his fall collection for Nina Ricci on the work of such artists as John Currin, Marlene Dumas and John Singer Sargent. Thus, he had no choice but to title the collection “Portrait of a Lady.” If the headline, appropriated for fashion spreads too many times to count, read trite, the clothes did not. Like all great portraiture, classic or contemporary, Copping illustrated his subjects in expertly mixed colors — bottle green against baby blue; pale pink with black or burgundy. He used the drama of a neckline or the tilt of a hat — wide-brimmed rabbit fur styles, in this case — to draw his women in softly vivid lines. Much of it was all cast through a modern Victorian lens. Parachute silk blouses were gathered high around the neck, and robelike coats, some with fur trims, fell off the shoulders in romantic dishabille. Some of the best looks were done in rich, dark velvet, such as full-leg pants, not unlike track pants, and louche coats that tied with rope belts. There were sturdy men’s fabrics and radzimirs — both crinkled for texture — to counter the wispy silks and Copping’s beloved lingerie looks. Though girly through and through, nothing was precious. In fact, this was one of Copping’s more sophisticated turns.

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paris fashion week|nina ricci fall rtw 2011